Basic Training: How to have a second bite at your mortgage cherry

Posted by Henry | HOME LOANS,INTEREST RATES,MORTGAGES | Monday 28 September 2015 11:00 am

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Cherries, like a better mortgage rate, are always good for the picking.

The task of finding a better home loan deal is not right up there in the excitement stakes.

  • This is the latest in a series of stories for anyone just starting to manage their own financial future.

Sometimes the easiest thing to do is to forget about it, and keep paying too much. Or – as most of us do when buying petrol, milk, or any number of smaller things – you could shop around, and save a bundle.

Refresh your memory Check what your current interest rate is, and what the loan includes. Are you on a fixed or variable loan? If it’s fixed, are there discharge fees?

The fine print “The key to finding the cheapest home loan is that it’s not just about finding the cheapest interest rate – you also need to take into account the fees and charges associated with the loan,” says Shelley Marsh, a former stock market analyst who writes personal finance blog Money Mummy.

“This is why you should look at the comparison rate as well as the interest rate.”

She says the comparison rate reflects the actual cost of the loan as it takes into account fees and charges, plus the interest payment you’ll have to make over the entire life of the loan.

Featuring… If you want to pay your home loan off quickly (who doesn’t?), Marsh suggests looking for three top features: unlimited extra repayments without fees, a redraw facility and a 100 per cent offset account.

Play the field Do your research before tackling your bank. Comparison websites such as Finder, Mozo, Canstar or RateCity can link you directly to lenders.

New website HashChing, “Australia’s first online marketplace for home loans” – advertises special deals, and puts you in touch with a local mortgage broker who can help you get that deal.

Chief executive Mandeep Sodhi says mortgage brokers have access to better rates, and can do the heavy lifting for you.

Negotiate hard. Sodhi says if you’re dealing directly with a bank, dig your heels in, and don’t take the first offer.

Threatening to jump ship remains a smart tactic. “Do you want to stick with the bank that’s not looking after you?” says Sodhi.

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Henry Sapiecha

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